Landsat 9

Recent Imagery

The Landsat Program

This joint NASA/USGS program provides the longest continuous space-based record of Earth’s land in existence. Every day, Landsat satellites provide essential information to help land managers and policy makers make wise decisions about our resources and our environment. + Landsat Case Studies ebook

Landsat 9—Continuing the Legacy
This new four-part video series shares the history of Landsat, how Landsat 9 works, how Landsat…

"Landsat fit all our criteria, and best of all it was free and very easy to download and work with."

— Dr. Emily Fairfax, Assistant Professor in the department of Environmental Science and Resource Management at California State University Channel Islands, Dec 11, 2019

"Without the free and open Landsat data policy, a lot of commercial applications wouldn’t be feasible and a lot of commercial companies—including GDA—would be very different than they are."

— Dmitry L. Varlyguin, Geospatial Data Analysis Corp. Vice President & Chief Scientist, Apr 9, 2019

"The Landsat mission has been monitoring Earth from orbit for more than 40 years. It is by far the longest continuous record of the surface of the planet, and certainly one of the most valuable data sets in existence."

— Betsy Mason, May 31, 2014

"Thanks to Landsat, we were able to dramatically improve our satellite base map in Google Earth and Google Maps on two separate occasions, first in 2013, and again in June 2016. Our most recent 15 meter-per-pixel global mosaic was made from over 1.5 million Landsat 7 and Landsat 8 images and forms the view of Earth you see across our mapping products for the first twelve zoom levels of the imagery basemap."

— Chris Herwig, Google Earth and Earth Engine, Jul 28, 2017

“One of the things we like about the [Landsat] satellite is that as it orbits the Earth it is calibrated consistently so we have a globally constant picture that we can make comparisons—apples to apples—of what’s happening. We can drill down to countries, even parks, and say this is what is happening at a local scale. That is another really powerful part of this big data story.”

— Matt Hansen, Oct 21, 2015

"We hope to accelerate innovation in climate research, humanitarian relief, and disaster preparedness efforts around the world by making Landsat data readily available near our flexible computing resources."

— Jed Sundwall, Mar 19, 2015

"Satellite imagery can be used retrospectively, meaning that the data collected by satellites today will probably help solve issues we are not currently even aware of—an advantage which is invaluable."

— Nathalie Pettorelli, Zoological Society of London, Jun 10, 2015

"Satellite imagery can help us get the biggest bang for our buck by targeting conservation initiatives in a specific window of time at key locations. Landsat is the longest running Earth observation satellite system we have, and free access to this data enables researchers to look at the effects of seasonality, climate cycles, and long-term trends in land-use change."

— Danica Schaffer-Smith, doctoral student, Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Mar 27, 2017

"It's really by stepping back and looking at the Earth, observing these changes in their context from space, can we really understand what's happening."

— Waleed Abdalati, NASA chief scientist, Jul 23, 2012

"The success of a mission, and the societal benefits it creates, relies on many factors, including design, manufacture, launch, and operation of the sensor. However, it also includes data acquisition, accessibility, availability, and continuity, all of which are embodied by the Landsat program."

— Yuan et al., Aug 1, 2020