Landsat 9

Recent Imagery

The Landsat Program

This joint NASA/USGS program provides the longest continuous space-based record of Earth’s land in existence. Every day, Landsat satellites provide essential information to help land managers and policy makers make wise decisions about our resources and our environment. + Landsat Case Studies ebook

Landsat 9 Completes Test Simulating Harsh Space Environment
The Landsat 9 satellite has successfully completed its most strenuous environmental test…

"Whether it’s since 1985 or 2000, we see this greening of the Arctic evident in the Landsat record."

— Logan Berner, a global change ecologist, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, Sep 23, 2020

"Landsat provides a global view of the the worlds alpine glaciers and enables us to track their retreat in ways that would be difficult without this important environmental time series."

— Andrew Klein, Texas A & M University, Dec 14, 2016

“Having water consumption maps produced quickly on Smartphones has been everyone’s dream. In two years time we hope to see all farmers watching their fields from their phones and scheduling irrigations. EEEFlux is making Landsat the evapotranspiration satellite.”

— Ayse Kilic, University of Nebraska, Oct 14, 2015

“By seeing in electromagnetic increments beyond the normal range of human vision, Landsat revealed whole new worlds hidden within the folds of a familiar world we thought we knew so well.”

— Stephen S. Hall, Feb 11, 1992

“The first year we made Landsat open, we put out 25,000 Landsat scenes. Today, we put out millions of scenes a year.”

— Kristi Kline, USGS Landsat Project Manger, on the open Landsat data archive, Sep 19, 2018

"The novelty of our study lies in the bigger picture—measuring glacier change over all main glaciated ranges in Bolivia—and in the identification of potentially dangerous lakes for the first time."

— Simon Cook, head of a team from Manchester Metropolitan University that measured Bolivian glacier area change from 1986–2014 with Landsat, Oct 20, 2016

"The long time span covered by the Landsat scenes allows us to determine long-term flow velocity trends. The high temporal resolution lets us analyze seasonal flow velocity variations of numerous outlet glaciers...The monitoring system provides a powerful tool to examine the flow velocity pattern throughout time and space, and we have detected an acceleration pattern for a number of outlet glaciers."

— M. Scheinert Scheinert, Ralf Rosenau, and Benjamin Ebermann, Dec 29, 2016

"The results of the Scopus bibliometric analysis indicate that inland water quality remote sensing has been growing dramatically since its introduction in the 1970s...The most pronounced year-on-year jump occurs right after 2008, which corresponds to the public release of freely available Landsat imagery by NASA and the US Geological Survey...This result is consistent with previous research showing that for multiple earth observation fields, the release of the Landsat archive resulted in more frequent and larger-scale studies."

— Simon N. Topp et al., 2020, Jan 7, 2020

“We’ve got this data of every field, of every country…. the archive is just going to continue to yield good information, good science, better management, reduce costs. It’s incredible.”

— John Schott, Rochester Institute of Technology, on the Landsat archive, Jan 9, 2018

“The data policy for Landsat was a paradigm shift for the world. There is no doubt about it.”

— Barbara Ryan, Director of GEO, Jan 23, 2018