Landsat 9

Recent Imagery

The Landsat Program

This joint NASA/USGS program provides the longest continuous space-based record of Earth’s land in existence. Every day, Landsat satellites provide essential information to help land managers and policy makers make wise decisions about our resources and our environment. + Landsat Case Studies ebook

Landsat 9 on Launch Pad atop Atlas V Rocket
Landsat 9, now scheduled for launch on Monday, Sept. 27, is safely encapsulated in its fairing…

“You can launch a new satellite, but you can’t put something up in the past. Landsat will always be that historic record that new satellites can tie themselves to.”

— Dr. Michael Wulder, Canadian Forest Service and Landsat Science Team member, Mar 13, 2020

“Very importantly, big data and its use for societal good is based on really progressive data policies. The Landsat sensor has 40 years of data in the archive and it is available to anyone on the planet.”

— Matt Hansen, Oct 21, 2015

“An alert system operating at the scale presented here depends on systematic global acquisitions, robust preprocessing, and free and accessible data. Only Landsat has these criteria at medium spatial resolutions, with Sentinel aspiring to emulate Landsat.”

— Matt Hansen, University of Maryland, Apr 27, 2016

"Landsat has really become the gold standard of remote sensing from space. It's provided an invaluable, indelible record of the recent history of our planet."

— Anne Castle, assistant secretary for water and science at the U.S. Department of the Interior, Jul 23, 2012

"The novelty of our study lies in the bigger picture—measuring glacier change over all main glaciated ranges in Bolivia—and in the identification of potentially dangerous lakes for the first time."

— Simon Cook, head of a team from Manchester Metropolitan University that measured Bolivian glacier area change from 1986–2014 with Landsat, Oct 20, 2016

“Usage rocketed in 2008, when Landsat made its images free. More than a million images were downloaded in the first year, compared with a previous annual high of 25,000 images sold. More than 20 million images have been downloaded since the archive opened and the rate continues to increase.”

— Wulder & Coops, Sep 3, 2014

“By using Landsat 8 imagery, and classification tree analysis, which is an advanced artificial intelligence routine, we have been able to construct a reliable classification system to identify cheatgrass infestations that is accurate. This has implications for fire susceptibility. Cheatgrass is driving wildfire on rangelands and we need to identify areas that have heightened susceptibility to wildfire.”

— Keith Weber, director of the Idaho State University GIS Center, Aug 7, 2015

“You can see the changes of your orchard over time & over space, and by measuring the canopy temperature [with Landsat] you can see whether the canopy is in balance with the rest of the environment around the trees.”

— Dr. Daniele Zaccaria, UC Davis, Jun 6, 2019

"@USGSLandsat @NASA_Landsat wrote the book on open data, how to do it right, how it creates businesses and benefits economy, and — of course — gifts the world with a 4+ decade *scientific* record of our planet's changing dynamics."

— Chris Herwig, Google GeoData Engineer, on 100 millionth Landsat download from USGS, Mar 11, 2020

“Continuing the critical observations made by the Landsat satellites is important now and their value will only grow in the future, given the long term environmental changes we are seeing on planet Earth.”

— John Grunsfeld, NASA associate administrator for science, Apr 16, 2015