Landsat 9

Recent Imagery

The Landsat Program

This joint NASA/USGS program provides the longest continuous space-based record of Earth’s land in existence. Every day, Landsat satellites provide essential information to help land managers and policy makers make wise decisions about our resources and our environment. + Landsat Case Studies ebook

Newly Launched Landsat 9 Mission to Monitor Earth’s Landscapes
Landsat 9 successfully launched at 2:12 p.m. EDT Monday from Vandenberg Space Force Base in…

 

Landsat satellite imagery is ideal for gauging vegetation cover shifts because it supplies spectral data for surface areas of about 90 square meters – fine enough to track changing spectral signal patterns across large study areas. 

— Stijn Hantson, Project Scientist, UCI Department of Earth System Science, Jun 21, 2021

"Landsat is an invaluable resource for developing these high resolution maps. Without the Landsat imagery we would not have the spectral information needed to decompose urban landscapes into Local Climate Zone types. Hence the data is at the heart of the project and it is the most critical piece—without Landsat there is no project."

— Johannes Feddema, University of Victoria, Dec 15, 2016

"The Landsat time series is so convenient and easy to use and has triggered science that was not possible a few decades ago."

— Zhe Zhu, Assistant Professor of Natural Resources and the Environment at UConn & 2018-2023 Landsat Science Team member, Sep 18, 2019

"The availability and accessibility of remotely sensed digital imagery obtained from Landsat satellites allow coastal scientist—and more importantly community members—the opportunity to map, evaluate and continuously monitor shoreline movement at regular intervals given the unprecedented pace of Arctic climate change."

— Dr. Ravi Darwin Sankar, geologist with the Arctic Institute of North America & the University of Calgary in Canada, Dec 12, 2019

“By seeing in electromagnetic increments beyond the normal range of human vision, Landsat revealed whole new worlds hidden within the folds of a familiar world we thought we knew so well.”

— Stephen S. Hall, Feb 11, 1992

“Landsat provides a very good coverage of Amazonia both spatially and temporally. We have known for some time already that the Landsat images can be used to identify ecologically relevant environmental and biotic variation in Amazonian rainforests, but this is the first time we use satellite images to actually predict species distributions.”

— Hanna Tuomisto, Amazon Research Team Lead, University of Turku, Sep 6, 2018

“The issue of forest disturbance could not have been addressed without our analysis of Landsat Time-series Stacks"

— Charles Perry, USDA Forest Inventory and Analysis, Dec 14, 2015

“There are more than 800 billion Landsat-derived pixels of land in our imagery. If we printed out just our Landsat-based world map at poster resolution, it would cover two acres.”

— Charlie Loyd, Dec 22, 2014

"“When the first images appeared, people would talk about the folds in the Appalachian Mountains. There had been textbooks written that described the processes that lead to those formations. For the first time it was possible to observe from great height what people had been talking about for hundreds of years.”

— Dr. Jim Irons, Landsat 8 Project Scientist, Mar 1, 2014

“The most unique thing about Landsat is its length of record… The ability to go back 30 years or more is something you just can’t do with any other sensor.”

— Andrew Elmore, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, Dec 14, 2017