Search
Close this search box.

Kamchatka: The Erupting Peninsula

Kamchatka: The Erupting Peninsula

[by Adam Voiland, NASA Earth Observatory] Explorer Stepan Krasheninnikov first pointed it out in 1755: “Perhaps there is no other region in the world where so many volcanoes and hot springs are to be found in so small a space as here on Kamchatka.” There may not be another land mass on Earth where so many volcanoes and hot springs are crammed into so little space. Situated along the Pacific Coast of Russia, the Kamchatka Peninsula is part of the Ring of Fire, one of the most geologically active zones on the planet. More than 300 volcanoes dot the peninsula, including 29 active ones. And the volcanoes are as diverse–in shape, size, geologic formations, and eruptive styles–as they are numerous.
In September 2014, Landsat 8 captured six clear images that were stitched into a mosaic of Kamchatka’s often cloudy east coast. Five volcanoes displayed plumes of steam, gas, or ash that day. From north to south, they are: Shiveluch, Bezymianny, Kizimen, Karymsky, and Zhupanovsky. The logistics of maintaining ground-based sensors in this rugged region make satellites a necessity for monitoring the volcanoes.

Further Reading:
+ “Volcanoes of Kamchatka,” NASA Earth Observatory
+ “Kamchatka: The Erupting Peninsula” on YouTube

On Key

Recent Posts

Allison Nussbaum gives a Hyperwall talk about Landsat’s free-and-open data policy and how it paved the way for data products including vegetation indices and evapotranspiration.

Landsat Outreach: Denver Edition

Landsat outreach was in full swing in Denver, Colorado at Geo Week and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) conference. The outreach team was represented by coordinator

Read More »
Landsat 2023 in Review: An image of the Landsat 9 satellite and a satellite image with the year "2023" written below it.

Landsat 2023 – A Year in Review

A delve into Landsat-based studies revealing the environmental impact of river mining, the decline in global lake water levels, and the risks of rising sea levels on coastal habitats. Plus, a sneak peek at what the future of the Landsat program holds with the introduction of Landsat Next.

Read More »
On Key

Related Posts

Allison Nussbaum gives a Hyperwall talk about Landsat’s free-and-open data policy and how it paved the way for data products including vegetation indices and evapotranspiration.

Landsat Outreach: Denver Edition

Landsat outreach was in full swing in Denver, Colorado at Geo Week and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) conference. The outreach team was represented by coordinator

Read More »