Search
Close this search box.

It's a Wrap: LDCM's Thermal Instrument Ships

It's a Wrap: LDCM's Thermal Instrument Ships

TIRS
The shipping container lid as it is lowered over TIRS. Photo credit: Matthew Montanaro
Yesterday the Landsat Data Continuity Mission’s Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) passed its pre-ship review.

After being packed in a special container, TIRS was loaded onto a truck for shipment to the spacecraft contractor, Orbital Sciences, Corp., at 10 a.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 7. The truck is scheduled to leave NASA Goddard on Wednesday and arrive in Arizona on Friday.
Once TIRS arrives at Orbital’s Satellite Manufacturing Facility in Gilbert, Arizona post-ship testing will occur followed by integration onto the spacecraft.
TIRS was designed, built, and tested in three and a half years in-house at NASA Goddard. This is an incredibly fast development and delivery time. The TIRS engineers worked on instrument testing around the clock through the holiday season. The scientists reviewing the TIRS testing data are very pleased with the instrument performance.
One of the important applications of TIRS will be to help scientists and resource managers monitor water evaporation and transpiration over Earth’s land surface by measuring radiation emitted in two thermal bands of the electromagnetic spectrum. TIRS’s resolution is 100 meters, which allows monitoring on a field-by-field basis for agriculture. This type of detail is vital for water managers in the semi-arid western U.S. states.

TIRS
TIRS, packed and waiting to ship. Photo credit: Matthew Montanaro

Further information:
TIRS Completes Pre-Ship Testing
Landsat’s TIRS Instrument Comes Out of First Round of Thermal Vacuum Testing
Container containing TIRS
Container containing TIRS being secured on shipping truck. Photo credit: Matthew Radcliff

TIRS
TIRS container is loaded onto the shipping truck. Photo credit: Matthew Radcliff

On Key

Recent Posts

Allison Nussbaum gives a Hyperwall talk about Landsat’s free-and-open data policy and how it paved the way for data products including vegetation indices and evapotranspiration.

Landsat Outreach: Denver Edition

Landsat outreach was in full swing in Denver, Colorado at Geo Week and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) conference. The outreach team was represented by coordinator

Read More »
Landsat 2023 in Review: An image of the Landsat 9 satellite and a satellite image with the year "2023" written below it.

Landsat 2023 – A Year in Review

A delve into Landsat-based studies revealing the environmental impact of river mining, the decline in global lake water levels, and the risks of rising sea levels on coastal habitats. Plus, a sneak peek at what the future of the Landsat program holds with the introduction of Landsat Next.

Read More »
On Key

Related Posts

Allison Nussbaum gives a Hyperwall talk about Landsat’s free-and-open data policy and how it paved the way for data products including vegetation indices and evapotranspiration.

Landsat Outreach: Denver Edition

Landsat outreach was in full swing in Denver, Colorado at Geo Week and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) conference. The outreach team was represented by coordinator

Read More »