Search
Close this search box.

Tracking Change Over Time

Tracking Change Over Time

USGS has released a new educational product, titled: “Tracking Change Over Time.” The product is intended for students in grades 5–8. As USGS explains: “Landsat satellites capture images of Earth from space—and have since 1972. These images provide a long-term record of natural and human-induced changes on the global landscape. Comparing images from multiple years reveals slow and subtle changes as well as rapid and devastating ones. Landsat images are available over the Internet at no charge. Using the free software MultiSpec, students can track changes to the landscape over time—just like remote sensing scientists do! The objective of the Tracking Change Over Time lesson plan is to get students excited about studying the changing Earth. Intended for students in grades 5–8, the lesson plan is flexible and may be used as a student self-guided tutorial or as a teacher-led class lesson. Enhance students’ learning of geography, map reading, earth science, and problem solving by seeing landscape changes from space.”
Further Information:
USGS Publication: Tracking Change Over Time

On Key

Recent Posts

Allison Nussbaum gives a Hyperwall talk about Landsat’s free-and-open data policy and how it paved the way for data products including vegetation indices and evapotranspiration.

Landsat Outreach: Denver Edition

Landsat outreach was in full swing in Denver, Colorado at Geo Week and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) conference. The outreach team was represented by coordinator

Read More »
Landsat 2023 in Review: An image of the Landsat 9 satellite and a satellite image with the year "2023" written below it.

Landsat 2023 – A Year in Review

A delve into Landsat-based studies revealing the environmental impact of river mining, the decline in global lake water levels, and the risks of rising sea levels on coastal habitats. Plus, a sneak peek at what the future of the Landsat program holds with the introduction of Landsat Next.

Read More »
On Key

Related Posts

Allison Nussbaum gives a Hyperwall talk about Landsat’s free-and-open data policy and how it paved the way for data products including vegetation indices and evapotranspiration.

Landsat Outreach: Denver Edition

Landsat outreach was in full swing in Denver, Colorado at Geo Week and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) conference. The outreach team was represented by coordinator

Read More »