Landsat 9 Launches Sept. 16, 2021 in:
 
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Landsat 9

Recent Imagery

The Landsat Program

This joint NASA/USGS program provides the longest continuous space-based record of Earth’s land in existence. Every day, Landsat satellites provide essential information to help land managers and policy makers make wise decisions about our resources and our environment. + Landsat Case Studies ebook

Landsat 9 Arrives at Vandenberg Space Force Base in Preparation for Launch
The Landsat 9 satellite has arrived at the VSFB on the central coast of California.

"The Landsat satellites have provided an unprecedented volume of high quality medium-resolution imagery spanning more than 30 years. Without this record it would be exceedingly difficult to place presently observed changes in ice discharge into a longer-term context."

— Alex Gardner, NASA JPL, Dec 18, 2015

“The community was very vocal regarding the value of a free and open data policy.”

— Frank Avila, National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency and National Geospatial Advisory Committee member, Jun 12, 2019

“Population in 1972… was around 4 billion people. When we launched Landsat 8 there was 7 billion people on the surface of the planet. Due to those factors our land use and land cover has changed dramatically and continues to change and we use the information and the images from the Landsat satellites to understand the change, to study the trends, and to predict the future.”

— Jim Irons, Nov 26, 2014

“By unleashing the power of our vast and open data resources, the Climate Data Initiative helps spark private sector innovation and will leverage resources for those on the front lines who are dealing with climate change. We are pooling into one place data from across the federal government to make it more accessible to the public and we hope our efforts will inspire other countries to follow suit.”

— Sally Jewell, Secretary of the Interior, Dec 9, 2014

“The water resources communities all through the United States, especially in the irrigated areas, are very appreciative that NASA put the thermal imager on Landsat 8 and that future Landsats are guaranteed to include a thermal imager.”

— Dr. Rick Allen, water resources engineering professor at University of Idaho, Apr 23, 2018

“The Landsat science community is giddy at the results they’re seeing from the latest Landsat instrument. It’s that much better than the last one."

— Cary Ludtke, Operational Space VP and General Manager, Ball Aerospace & Technology Corp., Nov 6, 2014

"We use Landsat 8 to document glacier velocity patterns on a mountain-range-wide scale. Mapping glacier velocity is facilitated by Landsat’s high radiometric resolution and precise geolocation."

— William Armstrong, glaciologist, University of Colorado at Boulder., Dec 12, 2016

"Landsat, a joint program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and NASA, offers an unparalleled record of our changing planet, with satellites that have been observing the Earth since 1972 to the present day."

— Chris Herwig, Google Earth and Earth Engine, Jul 28, 2017

"The long time span covered by the Landsat scenes allows us to determine long-term flow velocity trends. The high temporal resolution lets us analyze seasonal flow velocity variations of numerous outlet glaciers...The monitoring system provides a powerful tool to examine the flow velocity pattern throughout time and space, and we have detected an acceleration pattern for a number of outlet glaciers."

— M. Scheinert Scheinert, Ralf Rosenau, and Benjamin Ebermann, Dec 29, 2016

"Because Landsat's been operating for so long—thermal imaging has been enabled since the 1980s—we can study how patterns in water use have changed over the landscape over long periods of time as the climate has changed and as land use patterns have changed. So Landsat has been really a critical sensor for our work."

— Dr. Martha Anderson, USDA Researchers and Landsat Science Team Member, Apr 22, 2020