Search
Close this search box.

Landsat 'Sees in the Dark' the Evolution of Antarctica’s Delaware-sized Iceberg

Landsat 'Sees in the Dark' the Evolution of Antarctica’s Delaware-sized Iceberg

[Source: Maria-Jose Vinas Garcia, NASA’s Earth Science News Team]
As Antarctica remains shrouded in darkness during the Southern Hemisphere winter, the Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) on Landsat 8 captured a new snap of the 2,240-square-mile iceberg that split off from the Antarctic Peninsula’s Larsen C ice shelf on July 10-12. The satellite imagery is a composite of Landsat 8 as it passed on July 14 and July 21 and shows that the main berg, A-68, has already lost several smaller pieces. The A-68 iceberg is being carried by currents northward out of its embayment on the Larsen C ice shelf. The latest imagery also details a group of three small, not yet released icebergs at the north end of the embayment.

thermal image of Larsen C
Landsat 8 thermal infrared image of the Larsen C ice shelf. Image credits: NASA Goddard/UMBC JCET, Christopher A. Shuman

progression of Larsen C iceberg formation
For more information:
+ Massive Iceberg Breaks Off From Antarctica​
+ Here’s how we were able to see that giant chunk of ice break off of Antarctica, Popular Science

On Key

Recent Posts

Earthrise

Remembering Bill Anders

Anders, 90, the astronaut who captured the iconic Earthrise photograph, died on June 7, 2024, when the plane he was piloting crashed into the San Juan Channel.

Read More »
On Key

Related Posts

Earthrise

Remembering Bill Anders

Anders, 90, the astronaut who captured the iconic Earthrise photograph, died on June 7, 2024, when the plane he was piloting crashed into the San Juan Channel.

Read More »